Home » Content » Breakout Block G

Breakout Block G

  • Talking to Strangers: How to Get the Eager, the Reluctant and Even the Haters to Give a Good Interview
    Dean Nelson, Director, Journalism Program, Point Loma Nazarene University, San Diego Dean Nelson is the founder and director of the journalism program at Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego, and host of the annual Writer's Symposium By The Sea. His book is Talk To Me: How To Ask Better Questions, Get Better Answers, and Interview Anyone Like a Pro (HarperCollins).
    Talking to Strangers: How to Get the Eager, the Reluctant and Even the Haters to Give a Good Interview
    Interviewing is the single most important way journalists get information. Yet sometimes the perfect interview feels more like luck than skill. But great interviews aren’t the result of serendipity and intuition. They’re the result of careful planning and good journalistic habits. This session will give you the tools you’ll need to get people to talk to you, and to get worthwhile information from them. This is a useful session particularly for younger journalists who feel perhaps too tied to screens for their information, when it is faces and voices that reveal one’s true humanity.
  • Freelancing 101: How and When to Hang Out Your Shingle
    • Hazel Becker, Freelance Journalist (@spjhazel) Hazel Becker spent 50 years writing, editing and developing publications for niche audiences. She freelanced before and after 30 years of employment with BNA, a D.C. publishing company now part of Bloomberg. In retirement she volunteers for SPJ and is a founding member and former chair of its Freelance Community.
    • Katherine Reynolds Lewis, Independent Journalist (@KatherineLewis) Award-winning science journalist Katherine Reynolds Lewis covers children, social justice, and mental health for the Atlantic, New York Times, and Undark. Her book, The Good News About Bad Behavior, grew from Mother Jones’ most-read story. Founder of the Institute for Independent Journalists, she's former national correspondent for Newhouse and Bloomberg.
    • Candace Y.A. Montague, Independent Journalist (@urbanbushwoman9) Candace Y.A. Montague is an award-winning online and print freelance journalist in Washington, DC. She has over 12 years experience covering health, racial and gender equality and social justice issues for several local, trade, and national publications.
    • Clayton Gutzmore, Freelance Journalist (@moregutz72) Candace Y.A. Montague is an award-winning online and print freelance journalist in Washington, DC. She has over 12 years experience covering health, racial and gender equality and social justice issues for several local, trade, and national publications.
    Freelancing 101: How and When to Hang Out Your Shingle
    There’s no “best” time for journalists to give freelancing a try — you can get started as soon as you know how to put a story together. Freelancing can be good for student journalists, recent grads, as a full-time pursuit or a side gig to other ventures, when you’re laid off, or as a step-down to retirement. You just need to know how to get started! This session will show you the basics — how to find work through networking and pitching — and provide business tools you need to begin working as an independent journalist.
  • Telling the Stories of Vulnerable People: A Conversation About Trauma-Informed Journalism
    • Sandy West, Independent Journalist Sandy West is a former full-time staff writer for local newspapers, business publications and the Associated Press. She is currently an independent journalist writing on health-related issues, juvenile justice, child welfare. She has reported on the AIDS crisis, murder trials, mental health issues, Covid, and political attacks on transgender youth.
    • Ann Hinga Klein, Independent Journalist Ann Hinga Klein, an independent journalist, has covered forced migration, gender identity, climate change, homicide and domestic violence. She reported on the pandemic’s devastation in America’s prisons and jails for The New York Times and was part of a team awarded the 2021 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service.
    • Jourdan Bennett-Begaye, Editor, Indian Country Today Jourdan Bennett-Begaye is the editor of ICT. She is the first woman to be the chief news executive and top editor of the 40-year-old newspaper and website. She is Diné and based in Washington, D.C. She is also a Native American Journalists Association (NAJA) board member.
    • Naseem Miller, Senior Health Editor, The Journalist's Resource Naseem Miller is senior health editor at The Journalist's Resource, where she also reports on the intersection of journalism and trauma. She was part of the Orlando Sentinel’s 2016 Pulitzer Prize finalist reporting team that covered the Pulse nightclub shooting. In 2017, she co-started the Journalists Covering Trauma Facebook group.
    Telling the Stories of Vulnerable People: A Conversation About Trauma-Informed Journalism
    Whether reporting on gun violence, social justice, COVID-19, sexual assault, climate disaster or gender identity, journalists often speak with people or sources experiencing traumatic events. Knowing how to bring sensitivity and earn trust is essential for telling those impactful stories with honesty. Experienced panelists will offer best practices for trauma-informed reporting, including ways to establish and maintain trust, elicit impactful narratives, tell the story with care and respect and maintain story integrity throughout editing. Panelists will also offer resources for reporters to protect their own mental well-being. There will be time for questions and sharing experiences.
  • Google Tools Training — Detecting Disinformation
    Frank Bi, Director of Tools & Technology, @frankbi, Star Tribune Frank Bi is journalist, technologist, educator and nonprofit leader passionate about media and technology. He is the Director of Tools & Technology at the Star Tribune. Frank is also the president of the New York chapter of the Asian American Journalists Association. He lives in Minnesota and New York City.
    Google Tools Training — Detecting Disinformation
    In a sea of information, getting the right information is critical to our jobs as journalists. But how do we find what we need effectively and efficiently? How do we also detect and verify that information? What tools, strategies and techniques help us ensure the accuracy of our work? This session will look to answer these questions and more, with priority on workflows and examples that will help us detect disinformation.
  • Keeping News Alive in Small Town America
    • Kevin Z Smith Kevin Z. Smith is the executive director of the Kiplinger Program in Public Affairs Journalism at Ohio University. He directs Kiplinger's global education program focusing on preserving and advancing public affairs reporting. He is a former SPJ national president, board and foundation member with 43 years in SPJ.
    • Andrew Alexander Former Washington Post ombudsman Andrew Alexander is an award-winning journalist who has been a reporter, editor and bureau chief during a five-decade careers. He is the Visiting Professional at the Ohio University Scripps College of Communication. He chairs Foothills Forum, an innovative and thriving nonprofit producing award-winning, local, in-depth journalism.
    • Steve Waldman Steven Waldman is president and co-founder of Report for America, a national service program that places emerging journalists into local newsrooms. He was Senior Advisor to the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, serving out of the Office of Strategic Planning. He authored the report "Information Needs of Communities".
    Keeping News Alive in Small Town America
    Revenue declines, social media competition and staffing shortages are all helping create news deserts across America. That’s never truer than in small towns. This session will explore innovative ways companies, nonprofits, consortiums, start-ups and families are developing a variety of local news ecosystems at a time when we are at a democratic crossroads and America needs an independent press more than ever.