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Breakout Block A

  • Fundraising Basics: Principles & Techniques (Part 1)
    Ann Fitzgerald, Faculty Member, The Fund Raising School at Indiana University’s Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Ann Fitzgerald is a faculty member at The Fund Raising School at IU’s Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. She is founder of AC Fitzgerald (www.acfitzgerald.com), a consulting firm offering strategic advice and communications to nonprofits. Ann has a master’s degree in philanthropic studies from Indiana University.
    Fundraising Basics: Principles & Techniques (Part 1)
    Part 1: Expand your nonprofit by developing your fundraising skills! In this hands-on session, learn about the current philanthropic landscape to discover where funds are coming from and where you should look. You will learn to utilize the fundraising cycle and six rights of fundraising to connect and develop your nonprofit’s donor network.
  • Thinking About the Facts: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Christopher Karadjov, California State University, Long Beach Christopher Karadjov has been a journalist and journalism educator for 30+ years. He has worked in print, broadcast and digital-only publications on two continents in three languages. Karadjov studies journalism practices, media effects and patterns of information flow.
    Thinking About the Facts: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Learn how your newsroom can present stronger, more visually appealing content for readers and viewers. In this how-to session you will learn about the changing role of public information officers, given the evolving and dynamic media landscape. Presenters will discuss options to help you connect with experts, find data, graphics, photography and b-roll — all cost-free content to enhance your storytelling. The session also explores how to best approach public information officers who are circumventing your requests and offer tips for building a transparent and resourceful relationship with them. These tips are applicable for reporters covering all beats.
  • Tips for Working with Your PIO
    • Sandra Baltazar Martínez, Senior Public Information Officer, University of California, Riverside (@sbaltazarm) Before joining UCR, Sandra’s 18-year career as a bilingual journalist included The Press-Enterprise, The Santa Fe New Mexican, and most recently managing editor for La Prensa (Inland Empire). Among other accolades, she is a Knight Foundation Fellow. Sandra holds a master’s in community journalism from the University of Alabama.
    • La Monica Everett-Haynes, Associate Vice President and Chief Communications Officer for Strategic Communications and Public Affairs, San Diego State University (@SDSU) La Monica holds more than 20 years of combined experience as a journalist, communications professional and higher education researcher and scholar. Among other responsibilities, she leads a team that oversees news, marketing, and issues management and crisis communications. She earned a M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Arizona.
    Tips for Working with Your PIO
    Learn how your newsroom can present stronger, more visually appealing content for readers and viewers. In this how-to session you will learn about the changing role of public information officers, given the evolving and dynamic media landscape. Presenters will discuss options to help you connect with experts, find data, graphics, photography and b-roll — all cost-free content to enhance your storytelling. The session also explores how to best approach public information officers who are circumventing your requests and offer tips for building a transparent and resourceful relationship with them. These tips are applicable for reporters covering all beats.
  • Up in the Air – Using Drones to Cover Stories
    • Denise Dunbar Denise Dunbar is publisher and executive editor of the Alexandria Times newspaper. She has worked for the Commonwealth of Virginia's department of Health and Human Services, the Central Intelligence Agency and the Charlotte Observer newspaper.
    • Greg Agvent Greg Agvent is Senior Director of the CNN Aerial Imagery & Reporting unit, CNN Air. Agvent has led CNN’s unmanned aerial systems program since its initiation in 2013. He has overseen the development of all facets of CNN’s aerial operations, including training, safety management systems, operations, risk management and expansion.
    • Charles D. Tobin Charles D. Tobin is a litigator, former journalist and Practice Leader of Ballard Spahr's Media and Entertainment Law Group. He defends the media in libel and privacy lawsuits in state and federal trial and appellate courts. He also advises media clients on the developing laws regulating drone use.
    Up in the Air – Using Drones to Cover Stories
    You don’t have to know how to operate a drone to be thinking about how the technology can enhance your storytelling. Come learn from the best about what you need to know to use drones for news gathering. The panel will feature national experts on using drones to report news stories. We will discuss rules and permitting requirements around drone use, how to become trained in the use of drones, and legal implications of using drone footage. Questions from the audience are welcome.
  • Expanding Local Coverage Through Data
    • Gabriel Kahn, professor, USC Annenberg, @gabekahn Gabriel Kahn is a professor of professional practice at USC's Annenberg School of Journalism. He helped developed Crosstown, a system that allows small, local newsrooms to tap into troves of data to deepen coverage and audience engagement. Kahn was previously a foreign correspondent and editor at The Wall Street Journal.
    • Ashley Talley, enterprise executive producer, WRAL Ashley Talley is the enterprise executive editor at WRAL in Raleigh, where she has launched numerous digital initiatives and spearheaded the station's push into using local data.
    Expanding Local Coverage Through Data
    Even small, local news organizations can harness data to drive coverage. Learn how newsrooms in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Raleigh, North Carolina, are using local data to find scoops, increase engagement and even cover individual neighborhoods. This system, developed by computer scientists and journalists at University of Southern California, turns publicly available data into news, while lowering the costs of reporting.